The Box
The Door
The Drawer
Construction
Quality

Construction
Warranties
KCMA

Manufacturers

KCMA

The Kitchen Cabinet Manufacturers Association (KCMA) sponsors the nationally-recognized testing program for cabinets, ANSI/KCMA A161.1, Performance & Construction Standard for Kitchen & Vanity Cabinets. That’s a mouthful, but knowing what it stands for can definitely pay off.

According to the KCMA, “Cabinets that comply and bear the KCMA certification seal are recognized in the marketplace as a quality product able to perform after a rigorous battery of tests simulating years of typical household use.”

Things to keep in mind: the certification program is voluntary. Every cabinet available has not been tested. In suit, each line needs to be individually tested—a manufacturer can have one approved line, but that doesn’t make them all certified.

The KCMA tests create, in accelerated form, the cumulative effects of years of normal kitchen conditions. When you purchase a cabinet with the KCMA seal, know that your cabinets have passed the following tests:

  • Doors are properly aligned and close without excessive binding or looseness.
     

  • All wood parts were dried to a moisture content of 10 percent or less at the time of fabrication.
     

  • Cabinets are suitable for use in kitchens and bathrooms, withstanding exposure to grease, solvents, water, detergent and steam.
     

  • Mounted wall cabinets were gradually loaded to 500 pounds without visible signs of failure in the cabinet or the mounting system.
     

  • All shelves and bottoms were loaded at 15 pounds per sq. ft. and maintained for seven days to check for joint separation and bending.
     

  • Drawers were loaded at 15 pounds per sq. ft. and opened and closed 25,000 times to ensure proper drawer assembly and operation.
     

  • To ensure tight and proper connection of doors, door-holding devices and hinges, doors are opened and closed through a full 90-degree swing 25,000 times.
     

  • The cabinet door has been placed in a hotbox at 120 degrees Fahrenheit and 70 percent relative humidity for 24 hours to test the finish for discoloration, blistering and film failures.
     

  • To ensure kitchen and bath durability, exposed surfaces were subjected to vinegar, lemon, orange and grape juices, ketchup, coffee, olive oil and 100-proof alcohol for 24 hours (and mustard for one hour). The finish did not show appreciable discoloration or stain that would not disperse with ordinary polishing.

     

   

 

 

 

one

two

Page 3

 
 

 

CABINETS .COM    DRESS YOUR HOME RIGHT     HOME  ●  FORM   ●  FASHION   ●  FUNCTION   ●   YOU   ●  GALLERIES   ●  FOR MEDIA
© 2000 - 2004 by Cabinets.com . All rights reserved.     
Terms of Use